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Niche Drinks secures approval to build Irish whiskey distillery

Published 03 February 2017

Niche Drinks has secured approval from Derry City & Strabane District Council to construct a distillery in Derry, Northern Ireland, for its Irish whiskey brand The Quiet Man.

Niche Drinks has reportedly invested £12m into the Quiet Man at Ebrington. The new facility is expected to open by the middle of 2018.

According to BBC, this is the first whiskey distillery to be opening in the city after 200 years. Ebrington region was once an army base but it is now the largest single regeneration site in the city.

The upcoming facility is expected to produce about 500,000 litres of malt whiskey per year. Presently, Quiet Man is produced by liquid sourced from third party and the stocks being matured by Niche Drinks.

Niche Drinks managing director Ciaran Mulgrew was quoted by The Spirits Business said: “This is tremendous news for us as a business and also for the city – we intend to build a top class visitor centre at the distillery, focusing on Derry’s long history as an Irish whiskey-producing city.

“This will be a major attraction for the city and the renewed interest in Irish whiskey and whiskey tourism will give the city a boost.

“The project has been in the planning stages for quite some time and we can press on now and arrange delivery dates for the stills and other key pieces of equipment. A lot of preparation has been done and we are aiming for first distillations to take place in early 2018.”

Irish Whiskey Association (IWA) head Miriam Mooney noted that in 2013, there were only four distilleries in Ireland and now there are 16 distilleries in production, while another 14 are in the planning process.

IWA is also emphasising on whiskey tourism in the region and expects that by 2025 it would reach about 1.9 million from the present 650,000 per year.